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Some news from the darkroom…

Film Paper & Workshops…

Blanco Negro is happy to announce the arrival of Foma Bohemia’s latest film, Retropan 320 in the 120 format. I am pretty excited to be testing the new film this weekend and dusting off the Mamiya 7 & C330 and may even get a few prints off next week… Stocks are very limited at this stage, but I shall be getting more delivered in the next few weeks. Cost per roll is $7.75

Also delivered are the sample packs of the new Bromoil paper 113 BO. Although only containing 5 sheets they are free to pick up ( in Newtown, NSW ) or I’m happy to post if the costs are covered. Drop me a line if interested. Again packs are very limited. The cost for the Bromoil paper is as follow’s:

10/8″ x 25 sheets $55.00     11/14″ x 10 sheets $55.00     11/14″ x 25 sheets $130.00

Workshop news

Last week I headed down to Victoria for a few days to teach at Gold Street Studios. This 2 day workshop covered many aspects of Silver Gelatin print making and the second day we toned a few dozen prints. I’m pretty sure we covered most toner combinations, but two of my fav’s was a print ( an image of an urn ) I locally bleached then tone in Thiocarbamide, then toned overall with Selenium and the other was a landscape that was toned in Thio. first, then toned again in my custom Blue toner for a Green effect. The students were pretty happy with the results 🙂

I’ll be travelling down to Gold Street Studios again this month to teach a few more workshops on alternative silver gelatin printing. The Lith printing workshop is fully booked, but there are still places available for the Liquid Emulsion lessons. Click here for more information : Gold St Studios

Before I head down though I’ll be beginning a new commission for Stephen Dupont to make a hand made  photographic book using Foma’s Liquid Emulsion. I’m not too sure how many pages, I think it is around the plus 200 mark and Steve was thinking of about 12 editions. I’m thinking I’ll be in need of a holiday afterwards! Thankfully Steve will be giving me a hand. We’ll be printing via the Devere DS Digital enlarger which will life a lot easier in regards to layout and consistently of the tonality. I’ll be posting some pics on our progress…

And that’s about it from the darkroom

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Silver Gelatin workshop at Gold Street Studio

I just thought I would put a shout “out there” regarding a placement at my upcoming workshop in Gold Street Studios this Thursday 26th and Friday 27th April. Anyone who is interested please contact Ellie Young directly via her website: http://www.goldstreetstudios.com.au/contact-us/

For more information regarding the workshop, please click HERE

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What’s the difference between the Fomapan films?

There are quite a few Fomapan films out there and sometimes it’s tough to choose the right one. To make it a little easier for all the new photographers, we’ve put together a little guide. Here are the ins and outs of the different films, we hope it helps you on your next project!

Fomapan 100

This film is a great all-rounder. Suitable for pretty much any outdoor shooting environment. Stylistically, Fomapan 100 offers a fine grain, producing sharp and ultra clear images. It features a wide exposure latitude which makes this black and white film quite forgiving and excellent for newcomers. Fomapan 100 is heavy on the contrast with beautiful tonality, fantastic for landscape work.

fomapan films fomapan 100
Fomapan 100 | Image Source: Flickr

 

Fomapan 200

The trusty workhorse. Fomapan 200 is a dependable film that is close enough to sharp whilst being close enough to fast. It holds deep blacks and contrasty whites incredibly well, whilst giving images a visible “filmic” grain that isn’t intrusive. Fomapan 200 also responds to double exposure beautifully.

fomapan films fomapan 200
Fomapan 200 | Image Source: Flickr
fomapan films fomapan 200 double exposure
Fomapan 100 | Double Exposure | Image Source: Blanco Negro

 

Fomapan 400

Fomapan 400 responds well to being pushed and pulled. Pull it back to 320 to keep some clarity and shoot a bit faster. Or push it to 640-800 to get an ultra grainy exaggerated film look. This film can sometimes cause debate on how well it scans, but it basically just comes down to personal preference. Either you love grain or you loathe grain, and that will determine whether this film is right for you. With a little bit of experimentation with different developers, this film can look amazing. Dare to experiment with Fomapan 400 and you’ll get some incredible results.

fomapan films fomapan 400
Fomapan 400 | Image Source: Flickr

 

Retropan 320

An ode to the old world, Retropan 320 is truly in a class of its own. This film is so “special” that it even has its own dedicated developer to maximise its full potential. What makes Retropan so different is that it doesn’t have an anti-halination layer. This means that the light exposing the film spreads, giving a beautiful, delicate halo effect if used correctly. Images will have a slightly brown tint that creates a lovely, whimsical glow. This film is not for the faint hearted and well worth sticking with over time. Don’t be too discouraged if your first rolls don’t turn out as planned, as experience will really make this film shine.

fomapan films retropan 320
Retropan 320 | Image Source: Flickr
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Ambrotype and Tintype workshops with Ellie Young

BOOKED OUT: Blanco Negro presents – Ambrotype and Tintype workshops with Ellie Young

Email info@blanconegro.com.au to enquire about future specialised classes.

Ellie Young takes a break from her busy schedule at Gold Street Studios in Victoria to present some very special workshops in Ambrotype and Tintype processes.

Since 1994 Ellie has been practicing and studying the art craft and science, of ‘alternative’ photographic processes. Ellie conducts workshops in a number of alternative processes in her studios, and at times also teaches these processes in collages and institutes around Australia. Ellie constantly exhibits and sells her work nationally and internationally.

TINTYPE WORKSHOP TUESDAY 21st JUNE

ElliehorseAbout Tintypes

Tintypes or ferrotypes are positive images created by a wet plate process. The black “tin” plate is coated with collodion, exposed in a large format camera and processed in a darkroom before the plate is dry.

History of Tintypes

The tintype was also know as the ferrotype and melainotypes became popular in the 1850’s as a cheaper and faster version of the daguerreotype. This wet emulsion was replaced with dry plates by the 1880’s.

About the workshop:

The day involves understanding coating – exposing and processes the plates. The chemicals use are volatile so it is not for those who have concerns about handling chemicals. The workshop includes chemical handling and safety issues.

What to bring:

4 x 5 camera including lens, dark cloth and shutter release. Special darkslides to hold the glass plates will be provided. Bring an apron or lab coat or old comfortable clothing. Lunch will be provided.

CLASS MAXIMUM 3

COST: $400 per person. BYO camera. Camera available for hire by request.

AMBROTYPE WORKSHOP WEDNESDAY 22nd JUNE

EllieteapotAbout Ambrotypes

Ambrotypes are under exposed negatives that appear as positive photograph. The black or clear glass plate is coated with collodion with added salts, light sensitivity is created by “dipping” coated plate into silver nitrate bath. The plate is exposed in camera and processed in a darkroom before the plate is dry. Each photograph is unique – “one off”. When protected with varnish they have an enduring life.

History of Ambrotypes

The ambrotype was discovered in 1850 – 1851 by Frederick Scott Archer. also well know as the and melainotypes became popular in the 1850’s as a cheaper version of the daguerreotype. This wet emulsion was replaced with dry plates by the 1880’s.

About the workshop:

The day involves understanding coating – exposing and processes the glass plates. The chemicals used are volatile so it is not for those who have concerns about handling chemicals. Material handling safety issues are included as part of the workshop.

What to bring:

4 x 5 camera including lens, dark cloth and shutter release. Special darkslides to hold the glass plates will be provided. Bring an apron or lab coat or old comfortable clothing. Lunch will be provided.

CLASS MAXIMUM 3

COST: $400 per person. BYO camera. Camera available for hire by request.